Teresa Alcoverro

Adjunct Faculty, Oceans and Coasts

Ph.D.

My current research interests examine (1) the role of biotic processes, and human perturbations, in controlling the flow of energy among trophic levels both within and between marine habitats, with emphasis on submerged vegetated habitats, (2) the use of biodindicators in seagrass ecosystems to detect water quality assessment and ecosystem change.

Much of the emphasis of the first objective is on experimental assessments of grazing intensity in temperate and tropical seagrass habitats, the responses of temperate and tropical seagrasses to this grazing, the population dynamics of the main herbivores (sea urchins, herbivorous fish, green turtles and dugongs) and the role of the seascape in changing the trophic interactions in marine systems. The second objective is mainly focused on the development of indexes for water quality assessment using bioindicators from the molecule to the ecosystem.

The overall significance of this research lies in its attempt to understand the processes that control the distribution and productivity of seagrass dominated habitats. Because of the widespread occurrence of these habitats, the extraordinary productivity and richness of their associated biota and the services they provide, the understanding of the factors controlling their distribution and the effect of human perturbations on those controlling factors is essential to our understanding. Both approaches clearly define good objectives of a better management and conservation.

Link to complete CV

Projects

Publications

Journal Article

2017

Coping with catastrophe: foraging plasticity enables a benthic predator to survive in rapidly degrading coral reefs

Dataset

2016

Long-lived groupers require structurally stable reefs in the face of repeated climate change disturbances.

Journal Article

2016

For traditional island communities in the Nicobar archipelago, complete no-go areas are the most effective form of marine managementFor traditional island communities, no-go areas are the most effective form of management

Journal Article

2016

"Choice" and destiny: The substrate composition and mechanical stability of settlement structures can mediate coral recruit fate in post-bleached reefs

Journal Article

2015

Seagrass Herbivory Levels Sustain Site-Fidelity in a Remnant Dugong PopulationSeagrass Herbivory Levels Sustain Site- Fidelity in a Remnant Dugong Population

Journal Article

2015

Fish community reassembly after a coral mass mortality: higher trophic groups are subject to increased rates of extinction

Journal Article

2015

Erosion of Traditional Marine Management Systems in the Face of Disturbances in the Nicobar Archipelago

Journal Article

2014

Seagrasses in the age of sea turtle conservation and shark overfishing

Journal Article

2014

Long-lived benthic predators require structurally stable reefs in the face of repeated climate-change disturbances

Journal Article

2013

Green turtle herbivory dominates the fate of seagrass primary production in the Lakshadweep islands (Indian Ocean)

Journal Article

2013

Greener pastures? High-density feeding aggregations of green turtles precipitate species shifts in seagrass meadows

Journal Article

2013

Long-Term occupancy trends in a data-poor dugong population in the Andaman and Nicobar Archipelago

Journal Article

2013

Complex ecological pathways underlie perceptions of conflict between green turtles and fishers in the Lakshadweep Islands.

Journal Article

2012

Structure and dynamics of South East Indian seagrass meadows across a sediment gradient

Journal Article

2010

Implications of conserving an ecosystem modifier: Increasing green turtle (Chelonia mydas) densities substantially alters seagrass meadows